Monthly Community Policing Council Meetings

As we learned from the Independent Monitor’s Third Report, which was released in early July, the Albuquerque Police Department has a long way to go on the road to reform. APD Forward invites all members of the community who are interested in the progress of reform at APD to attend Community Policing Councils. Voice your concerns and let APD get to know our communities better.

 What are Community Policing Councils?

Community Policing Councils are established in each of the city’s six area commands and are charged with evaluating the priorities, inner workings and effectiveness of the Albuquerque Police Department. The Councils are required by the settlement agreement between the Department of Justice and APD and are created to allow the community to voice concerns and make recommendations to APD. All Community Policing Council meetings are open to the public. Please respect the rules of the Councils related to public comment (for example, some Councils have time limits for public comments).

 Where are the Community Policing Councils?

The Community Policing Council most relevant to you is the one located in your APD “area command.” To find out what area command you are in (based on where you live), examine the City’s area command websites at https://www.cabq.gov/police/contact-the-police/area-commands and click the area you believe you are in. At the bottom of that page you will find a link to a map of the area (for example, the SE Area command map is available at (https://www.cabq.gov/police/documents/SE_Area_Command.pdf)

 When are the Community Policing Council Meetings?

Community Policing Council Meetings are usually held monthly in each of the area commands. For specific dates, times, and locations visit: https://www.cabq.gov/police/community-policing-council

 How do I become a voting member of the Community Policing Council?

To apply to be a voting member of a Community Policing Council, visit https://www.cabq.gov/mayor/police-outreach/community-policing-council-application. While all members of the public can attend council meetings, the council itself is made up of voting members who ultimately determine the agenda of each meeting and create recommendations, based on community input, to make to APD to improve the Department.

 Albuquerque deserves a well-trained, highly professional police department. There are many things each of us can do to help make that a reality. Participating in Community Policy Councils, and making them a safe and vibrant platform for dialog between communities and the department, is one of the best ways to get there.

 


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